Articles Tagged with: midwest
Cameron Hoerth

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Nineteen-year-old Cameron Hoerth lives in Manitowoc, WI and has been making photographs for 5 years. He works in Real Estate photography, but when making images for himself, he shoots primarily in black and white film and develops himself. He finds inspiration in minimalism.

http://cameronhoerthphoto.tumblr.com/


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Sam Phillips January 2016 Manitowoc, Wisconsin.

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February 2016, Manitowoc, Wisconsin.

February 2016, Manitowoc, Wiconsin.

February 2016, Manitowoc, Wiconsin.


Ryan Michalesko in Madison Wisconsin

Southern Illinois shooter Ryan Michalesko recently visited Madison, Wisconsin to job shadow the photo staff at the Wisconsin State Journal and also catch up with friends who attend the University of Wisconsin. He was kind enough to documented his trip for us.

To view more of Ryan’s work, visit his website: http://www.photosbylesko.com/

State Street, Madison, Wisconsin, March 16, 2016.

State Street, Madison, Wisconsin, March 16, 2016.

Brokaw, Wisonsin,  March 13, 2016.

Brokaw, Wisconsin, March 13, 2016.

Wisconsin State Capitol, Madison, Wisconsin, March 14, 2016

Wisconsin State Capitol, Madison, Wisconsin, March 14, 2016.

Overture Center for the Arts, Madison, Wisonsin, March 14, 2016

Overture Center for the Arts, Madison, Wisonsin, March 14, 2016.

Springfield, Illinois,  March 11, 2016.

Springfield, Illinois, March 11, 2016.


Primary Day 2016

It is primary election day in many states across the Midwest. In honor of that, we thought we would gather together a few of our favorite flag photos.

Percy, Illinois. December 1, 2015.

Percy, Illinois. December 1, 2015. – Isaac Smith

Morrisonville, Illinois. April 9, 2014. – Eric Ginnard

Morrisonville, Illinois. April 9, 2014. – Eric Ginnard

Witt, Illinois. April 8, 2014. – Eric Ginnard

Witt, Illinois. April 8, 2014. – Eric Ginnard

Olmsted, Illinois. January 24, 2013.

Olmsted, Illinois. January 24, 2013. – Isaac Smith

Steeleville, Illinois. March 14, 2016.

Steeleville, Illinois. March 14, 2016. – Isaac Smith

Hillsboro, Illinois. Jan. 28, 2014. – Eric Ginnard

Hillsboro, Illinois. Jan. 28, 2014. – Eric Ginnard


Alex Wroblewski

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Alex Wroblewski (b. 1987) is a student at Columbia College Chicago, and is originally from Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He started pursuing his bachelor’s degree in 2013 with the recommendation of an editor, while stringing for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Before attending college he worked as a truck driver, welder, barista, amongst other jobs. Since then he has covered the gun violence in Chicago, the war against ISIS in Iraq, and the unrest in Ferguson, Missouri. He will be interning at The New York Times during the summer of 2016, and plans on working overseas afterwards.

http://alexwroblewskiphoto.virb.com/

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Loyola Beach, Chicago, Illinois. August 2, 2015.

Loyola Beach, Chicago, Illinois. August 2, 2015.

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West Bend, Wisconsin. January 5, 2016.

Rogers Park, Chicago, Illinois. August 3, 2015.

Rogers Park, Chicago, Illinois. August 3, 2015.


George Lamboley

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George Lamboley is an Illinois-based photographer that enjoys documenting the highs and lows of modern existence. When not working with photography George enjoys coffee, reading fiction, sleeping late, and music of all sorts.


Alex Imeroff relaxes during his nightly shift at the Daniels Motel in LaSalle, Illinois December 30, 2015.

Alex Imeroff relaxes during his nightly shift at the Daniels Motel in LaSalle, Illinois December 30, 2015.

Ron Smith takes a break from woodworking in his Seneca, Illinois garage January 5, 2016.

Ron Smith takes a break from woodworking in his Seneca, Illinois garage January 5, 2016.

A patron of Francesco's Italian Pizza Kitchen in Elmhurst, Illinois talks on his phone on September 16, 2015.

A patron of Francesco’s Italian Pizza Kitchen in Elmhurst, Illinois talks on his phone on September 16, 2015.


Jacob Martz

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Bloomington native, Jacob Martz, has been making pictures for three years and is currently enrolled at the Herron School of Art and Design in Indianapolis, Iniana. Jacob finds beauty in the small, unnoticed aspects of life.


Downtown Bloomington, In., Nov. 22, 2013.

Downtown Bloomington, In., Nov. 22, 2013.

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Bloomington, In. June 3, 2015.

Bloomington, In. library, March 11, 2015.

Bloomington, In. library, March 11, 2015.


The Midwest as a Rural Fantasy
A mowed field Sept. 15, 2015 near Steeleville, Ill. – Isaac Smith

A mowed field Sept. 15, 2015 near Steeleville, Ill. – Isaac Smith

What gets lost in that stylization is people

A still lake. An orchard row. A sunset cornhusk. A floured wooden slab.

To a slew of young “creatives” who are choosing to stay put in midwestern cities (or return to them from coastal forays) images like these are the new signs of the midwest. These curated glimpses into simple, natural scenes constitute a well-intentioned departure from the midwest’s fast-food-eating, big-box-shopping, casserole-baking reputation. By visually refashioning the region into a pristine natural playground in digital and print media, they seem to say, “Look, coastal snobs! The midwest, too, has beauty!”

Indeed, the images are beautiful. The lake and the orchard are serene, inviting, captured in their perfect light. The husks and the slab are exalted objects, taken from mere household function into a realm of pure aesthetic form.

Salvador Fabcan sorts through apples brought by pickers in the field Sept. 1 2015 on Rendleman Orchard in Alto Pass. – Isaac Smith

Salvador Fabcan sorts through apples brought by pickers in the field Sept. 1 2015 on Rendleman Orchard in Alto Pass. – Isaac Smith

But something gets lost in this new midwest aesthetic—the region’s specificity, its lived cultures, the diversity of its people and scenes. What is purported to identify and define the midwest in fact feels indistinct. Latching onto a now-mainstream trend of #authentic living, these images’ insistence on simple, classic beauty whitewashes a midwest that could be shown in more multifaceted, and perhaps more interesting, lights.

For at least a decade now, we have seen the rise of “authenticity” as a style. New Yorkers invest in work boots, Carhartt jackets, and utility bags, elevating a downhome American sense of practicality into a citydweller’s luxury. The clothing trend matches a move in photography and advertising toward rustic simplicity. (Think Kinfolk magazine, which has become a touchstone for designers and creative directors.) For midwestern media to take up this style, which was to some extent already a romanticization of their region, is to peddle in an “authenticity” that was projected onto the heartland by coastal borrowers in the first place. And it is to broadcast not a place but a style.

Rich Walter sweeps corn off of the street Aug. 24 after loading a truck at Gateway FS in Evansville, Ill. – Isaac Smith

Rich Walter sweeps corn off of the street Aug. 24 after loading a truck at Gateway FS in Evansville, Ill. – Isaac Smith

What gets lost in that stylization is people—the kin and the folk. Who are the people at the lake—and who didn’t make it there that day? Who are the people visiting the orchard—and who owns it, who tends it, who buys the fruits of their labor? Who is husking the corn and preparing the meal? In replacing one image of the midwest with a supposedly more appealing one, the promoters of this new aesthetic leave out the specific identities, relationships, and stories that make up midwestern communities.

– Midwest native, Lindsay Welsch, currently lives in Bloomington, In. where she teaches freshman writing as a visiting lecturer at the Indiana University. She received her PHD in english in May 2015.